menu
windward.hawaii.edu

Activities

What Could It Be? PDF FACEBOOK SHARE ICON.

Place an object in a box and have your child guess what's in it by feeling the object with her hands.

What You Need:




• Small box
• Small household objects
• Blanket

What To Do:


Touching:
1. Find and place different household objects in a box. For example, a comb, spoon, rubber slipper, rice paddle, small stuffed animal, and so on.
2. Cover the box with a small blanket and ask your child to place her hand in the box to feel the objects. Have her choose one but not take it out of the box. Ask her to describe how it feels, and guess what it is.
3. Have your child place some items in the box and cover them up. Now it is your turn to guess.

Hearing:
1. Walk through your home with your child and experiment with sounds.
1. Have your child close her eyes and guess what objects are making certain sounds: jingle some keys, close a book, turn on the faucet, or turn on the alarm clock.
2. Ask her about the sound that each object makes. For example, “Does it make a rattling sound?” “Is it a loud or soft sound?”

Smelling:
1. Take a walk with your child around the neighborhood and talk about the different smells you encounter. For example, “Can you smell something cooking?” “Do you smell garbage close by?” “Can you smell the plumeria that are in bloom?”
2. When you get home, bring out several things that have a familiar smell to your child such as bath soap, shampoo, or toothpaste. Ask her to cover her eyes and smell the item you are holding. Have her guess what the item is.
3. Put a small amount of milk, juice, or water in a cup. Ask your child to close her eyes, smell what is in the cup, and guess what it is.
4. When preparing your family meal, ask your child to close her eyes. Hold different ingredients like parsley, ginger, onion, kim chee, or shoyu next to her nose. Ask her what it smells like and have her name the food item.

Tasting:
1. Ask your child to close her eyes. Put a small sample of food in her mouth to try. Ask her to guess what it is.
2. Have your child describe how each item tastes or feels in her mouth. Offer words that might help such as “spicy,” “sweet,” “sour,” “cold,” “soft,” or “chewy.”

Seeing:
1. Place three or four objects in front of your child.
2. Describe what each item looks and feels like as well as what it is used for.
3. Ask her to close her eyes. Take one object and hide it behind you.
4. Have her open her eyes and guess what is missing. If she gets stuck, give her clues by describing its traits. For example, “It is round. It feels smooth.”
Acknowledge her when she gets it right. “Yes, it’s your yellow ball!” Give her more clues if she needs them.